Photographer John Moore is in Venezuela covering the unrest over President Maduro's Government

Venezuelans loyal to former President Hugo Chavez prepare to mark one year anniversary of his death on March 5, 2014. The anniversary has been marred by recent protests against the government of Chavez' chosen successor Nicolas Maduro. With one of the highest inflation rates in the world, Venezuela has been in turmoil for almost three weeks as opposition protests have virtually paralyzed business in much of the country. Photographer John Moore has been there to capture the continued unrest.

Protesters run from tear gas fired by the Venezuelan national guard during an anti-government demonstration on February 27, 2014 in Caracas, Venezuela.

 

 A protester hurls a burning tire at national guard troops during an anti-government demonstration on March 2, 2014 in Caracas, Venezuela

 

Protesters roll a concrete cylinder towards Venezuelan national guard troops during an anti-government demonstration on February 27, 2014 in Caracas, Venezuela.

 

A protester sits over a drawing of a slain student during an anti-government demonstration on February 27, 2014 in Caracas, Venezuela.

 

Protesters run from tear gas fired by the national guard during an anti-government demonstration on February 27, 2014 in Caracas, Venezuela.

 

Protesters hold a barricade against a water canon fired by the national guard during an anti-government demonstration on February 27, 2014 in Caracas, Venezuela.

 

Protesters throw rocks at Venezuelan national guard troops during an anti-government demonstration on February 27, 2014 in Caracas, Venezuela.

A local resident delivers bread and coffee to student protesters at dawn on March 9, 2014 in San Cristobal, the capital of Tachira state, Venezuela. Local residents and students have manned barricades throughout the nights, skirmishing with security forces for almost a month, while protesting against the federal government. Tachira, which borders Colombia, has been a focal point for anti-government protests nationwide. 

 

Venezuelan national police fire tear gas at anti-government protesters on March 6, 2014 in Caracas, Venezuela.

 

 

 

A mural honors former Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez near the military barracks where Chavez is entombed on March 4, 2014 in Caracas, Venezuela. Workers made last minute preparations for Wednesday's ceremony marking the first anniversary of Chavez' death on March 5, 2013.

 

About John Moore

This has been republished from Reportage by GettyImages

John Moore is a senior staff photographer for Getty Images, currently based in New York City.

Moore has won top photography awards throughout his career. He has been honored four times from World Press Photo for both domestic and international work. The Overseas Press Club awarded him the prestigious Robert Capa Gold Medal for his work in Pakistan and the John Faber Award for his work in the refugee camps in Zaire. Both Pictures of the Year International and the National Press Photographers Association have named him the photographer of the year. He was part of the Associated Press team that won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography for coverage of the war in Iraq and, as a Getty staffer, was a finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer for Breaking News Photography for his coverage of the Arab Spring.

Since 2010 he has also focused on immigration issues throughout the United States. For 2013, with immigration reform at the top of the national agenda, Moore has spent most of the year photographing border security and immigration issues in Arizona, Texas, Colorado and in New York. This work has been consistently and prominently published throughout the U.S. media.

Moore joined Getty Images in 2005 based in Islamabad, Pakistan until July 2008. During that time he worked throughout South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, and particularly in Pakistan, where he courageously captured the assassination of Benazir Bhutto. For the past five years he has been based in the United States, first in Colorado, where he covered the worst effects of the recession on American families, bringing an exclusive and heartbreaking look at the nation's foreclosure crisis.

After graduating from the University of Texas at Austin in 1990, Moore joined the Associated Press, first based in Nicaragua, then India, South Africa, Mexico and Egypt. He has photographed in more than 75 countries on five continents

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