Child-trafficking and slavery blight modern day India. What’s the impact on the victims and their families? Our photographer, Daniel Berehulak, wanted to find out…

According to the human-rights organisation Impulse, 70,000 children are currently working in the coal-rich mines of Meghalaya. Daniel documented the experience of children being trafficked from their home country of Nepal or Bangladesh to the coal mines.

He worked through Impulse to follow a truck driver, as he picked up children from Nepal and Bangladesh and returned with them into India.

Daniel is one of three recipients of the inaugural Getty Images Editorial Fellowship, a program designed to reward and recognise the very best photojournalists on our team.

Every day, all over the world, our staff photographers confront the human condition – documenting struggles and triumphs, our moments of weakness and strength – so that all aspects of life can be depicted within the publications our customers represent.

Watch Daniel Berehulak.

 
 
  • JAINTIA HILLS, INDIA - APRIL 16: A boy works at a coal depot on April 16, 2011 near to Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. Local schools in the area, providing free tuition, find it difficult to convince parents of the benefits of education, as children are seen as sources of income. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
  • JAINTIA HILLS, INDIA - APRIL 14: Workers make their way home on April 14, 2011 in Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. Children and adults squeeze into rat hole like tunnels in thousands of privately owned and unregulated mines, extracting coal with their hands or primitive tools and no safety equipment. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
  • JAINTIA HILLS, INDIA - APRIL 14: Coal trucks make their way through town on April 14, 2011 in Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. Workers can earn as much as 150 USD per week or 30,000 Rupees per month, significantly higher than the national average of 15 USD per day. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
  • JAINTIA HILLS, INDIA - APRIL 15: Coal trucks and other vehicles move through town after being delayed due to a traffic accident on April 15, 2011 in Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. After traversing treacherous mountain roads, the coal is delivered to neighbouring Bangladesh and to Assam from where it is distributed all over India, to be used primarily for power generation and as a source of fuel in cement plants. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
  • JAINTIA HILLS, INDIA - APRIL 15: People gamble on a local game of dice in a market on April 15, 2011 in Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. Market days, a non working day, in towns like Lad Rymbai, are a well-known respite for workers. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
  • JIANTIA HILLS, INDIA - APRIL 13: Fourteen-year-old Chhai Lyngdoh, kicks out the coal from a container, as it is emptied onto a heap, after being craned out of a 300ft deep mine shaft on April 13, 2011 near the village of Latyrke near Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India.Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
  • JAINTIA HILLS, INDIA - APRIL 13: 22 year old Shyam Rai from Nepal makes his way through a rat hole tunnels inside of a coal mine 300 ft beneath the surface on April 13, 2011 near the village of Latyrke near Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India.. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
  • 38 year old Prabhat Sinha, from Assam, carries a load of coal weighing 60kg's, supported by a head-strap, as he ascends the staircase of a coal mine on April 16, 2011 near the village of Khliehriat, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
  • 12 year old Abdul Kayum from Assam pauses for a portrait, whilst working at a coal depot carrying coal to be crushed on April 15, 2011 near Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. Some of the labour is forced, and an Indian NGO group, Impulse, estimates that 5,000 privately-owned coal mines in Jaintia Hills employed some 70,000 child miners.Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
  • 16 year old Rafaqui Islam, from Assam, poses for a portrait, whilst working at a coal depot shovelling coal to be crushed on April 15, 2011 near Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. Despite the ever present dangers and hardships, children, migrants and locals flock to the mines hoping to strike it rich in India's wild east. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
  • 20 year old Anil Basnet pushes a coal cart, as he and a fellow worker pull coal out from the rat hole tunnel 300 ft below the surface on April 13, 2011 near the village of Latyrke near Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
  • A crane lifts miners out of the 300ft deep shaft of a coal mine, as workers break for lunch on April 13, 2011 near the village of Latyrke near Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India. Many workers leave homes in neighbouring states, and countries, like Bangladesh and Nepal, hoping to escape poverty and improve their quality of life. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
  • Women carry baskets of coal back to their village for sale, after having scavenged the coal illegally from an open-cast coal mine in the village of Jina Gora on February 09, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India's Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images
    zoom
See more images

We can help you tell your stories visually: talk to us now

Join the conversation. Leave a comment below or Tweet with #gettyinfocus

comments powered by Disqus