Last week was both an emotional and exciting week, as we welcomed the official release of Chris Hondros’ book, Testament, but also remembered the passing of an extraordinary person and friend.  Dedicated to his exceptional work as a conflict photojournalist, he gave a face to important global conflicts in Kosovo, Afghanistan, the West Bank, Iraq, Liberia, Egypt and Libya. Testament joins powerful images and essays from these events. 

Celebrating the release of his book at the powerHouse bookstore in Dumbo, Brooklyn, we honored Chris’ talent, passion and professionalism in the company of those who knew and loved him.  Amongst those persons were Getty Images Co-Founder and CEO Jonathan Klein; Co-Editor of Paris Match Magazine Regis Le Sommier; Director of Photography at Getty Images Pancho Bernasconi; and Managing Editor at Getty Images Sandy Ciric, who all spoke fondly of Chris and his enduring spirit.

“Chris spoke up for others and gave voice to those far from the levers of power who otherwise might not have been heard; and at his core, Chris was fully committed to a cause greater than himself,” said Getty Images Co-Founder and CEO Jonathan Klein.


“In the great adventure of the human kind, Chris liked contrast.  Through his lens, he tried to uncover common humanity, explain contrast and catch human moments,” said Chris’ colleague and Co-Editor of Paris Match Magazine Regis Le Sommier.

“The whole point of telling stories and the way Chris engaged in them was an intense desire to share an ebb and flow of unseen conflict. [He] wanted to cut through all the noise and frantically advance the terrible complex reality which is difficult to comprehend by any outside onlooker much less a Westerner opening up a paper,” recalls Managing Editor at Getty Images Sandy Ciric, from a conversation with Chris’ colleague and fellow photojournalist, Mario Tama.

"That Nikon F camera kit was my first inkling of a wider world.  A window that gave me my first glance into a photographic world that was then just a wild fantasy but that in fact came to be,” remembers Director of Photography at Getty Images Pancho Bernasconi, who recounts Chris’ personal story of his first camera.

Part of the proceeds from Testament benefit The Chris Hondros fund, which “supports and advances the work of photojournalists and raises awareness of the issues facing those reporting from conflict areas.”

Image credit: Josh Rozbruch
 

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